Testimonials

“I assembled and used my Uprooter yesterday and am extremely satisfied with this tool so far.

The Uprooter is a tool I can manage even though I am a petite 72 yr old female. The woodlands of my rural property in NE KS have become overgrown with invasive brush honeysuckle. The Uprooter pulls up specimens that are too large to hand pull but too small for the chainsaw. Until now, I had to use loppers and apply Tordon to these specimens. Those days are gone! Thanks to the Uprooter, I can now clear out more specimens in less time and with less effort.

Thank you for your dedication to designing and manufacturing a tool that helps even older rural property owners keep our lands healthy.”

Carey M., Lawerence, Kansas

 

“I received the Uprooter on Thursday. I used it today; it is great. I wish I had this years ago. My garden and yard is being invaded by Black Locust saplings, thorns allover them.  Thanks for a good product.”

Alex T., Westborough, Massachusetts

 

Got it. Love it. As promised, it is an improvement on the Weed Wrench. Thanks!

Louise H., Carlisle, Massachusetts

 

Last year I bought two Uprooters. First I bought the large one for my husband, and then I bought the smaller one…we LOVE the smaller one……buckthorn be GONE!

Cynthia H., Duluth, Minnesota

The product is fantastic! Great!  Works far better than I thought it would; I was ready to be disappointed and was most certainly not.

Thank you from the Mound, MN buckthorn farm.

Steve N., Mound MN

 

Took both of us standing on the Uprooter tool to get some of these out, but we cleaned up a bunch of tamarisk in the Bear River Bottoms this afternoon. Not bad for a couple of folks eligible for SS.

Bryan D., Logan, Utah

 

Pulled up all this Autumn Olive with our Uprooter.

Joy L., West Boylston, Massachusetts

I am very satisfied with the Uprooter which has worked well for pulling english holly.
Just discovered another use yesterday, pulling branches out of the ground that are imbedded in the soil after falling a tree. On some of the larger branches I had to trim them thinner. One 2” branch broken off near the surface with only a tapered end exposed was enough for the Uprooter to grab and pull out. This will save my chain saw chain because I used to saw the branches as close to the surface as possible which was not the best solutions since as the soil dried the branch ends could protrude, damaging mower blades.

Ed G., Creswell, Oregon

 

Russian Olive Removal at the Bear River Bottoms

One of the hazards of creating new wetlands is the introduction of undesirable species after the ground is disturbed. Some of these species can be controlled with good old fashioned elbow grease–if you have the right tools. Russian olives are one plant that can colonize a disturbed area very quickly. But, with the right tool applied at the right time, we can eliminate this invasion without resorting to chemical herbicide.

Posted by Bear River Land Conservancy on Friday, August 21, 2015

 

“One of the hazards of creating new wetlands is the introduction of undesirable species after the ground is disturbed. Some of these species can be controlled with good old fashioned elbow grease–if you have the right tools. Russian olives are one plant that can colonize a disturbed area very quickly. But, with the right tool applied at the right time, we can eliminate this invasion without resorting to chemical herbicide.”

Bear River Land Conservancy, Utah